Week One on the Low-FODMAP Diet

Week One on the Low-FODMAP Diet

The reason I have not posted in a while is because my time was taken up with trying this new diet to relieve my symptoms of IBS. After a very expensive shopping trip to the supermarket and a lot of preparing each evening I simply did not have time and was overwhelmed with the information I was discovering. Best of all, I am in a lot less pain, less bloating and overall feel better in myself.

I have only completed one week on this restricting diet and no it isn’t miraculous, I’m still not 100% but to eat a meal and not feel like my insides are at war with each other is a very welcoming sense of relief.

For all those unfamiliar with FODMAPs please see my explanation here: What are FODMAPs?

I knew I wanted to try the diet and I knew I would also need some direction. Not being a dietician I wanted to make sure I was following the diet correctly(otherwise I wouldn’t know if it was effective) and getting all the nutrients I needed.

So I went to the next best thing, a book. I chose The Complete Low FODMAP Diet by Dr Sue Shepherd and Dr Peter Gibson to be my guide throughout my foodie journey. It was scientific, covering everything I personally wanted to know with a range of recipes. My favourite part being the Menu Plan.

I roughly followed this menu plan, swapping meals for different days to suit me but I knew I was still getting a healthy balanced diet with foods that would hopefully not cause me any problems.

It was hard shopping for the week, reading all the labels and realising onion and garlic – things to avoid – were simply in a lot of things we eat everyday. The hardest part was trying to find allowable spices and sauces (stock and gravy). Especially as I am already on a gluten-free diet to reduce my symptoms.

I stuck to the recipes as much as I could with what I could find and for week two I’m hoping to devise a cheaper menu plan! Luckily I have a lot of herbs and spices already in the cupboard now to give my food flavour.

This was what my boyfriend feared the most, I was only going to subject him to my meals for the evening meal of the day but he thought they would be tasteless and overly healthy. Each day he was surprised with what I had cooked, not only due to the fact I had actually cooked (as this is not a talent of mine) but also the taste and variety of the food.

I found it exciting to try new foods such as, swordfish. Make pancakes with a savoury twist. Bake a handmade cheesecake, one of the things I had loved to eat before having to go on a gluten free diet and I didn’t bother trying to make my own as I assumed it was a lot of effort (turns out it is effortless, it just tests how patient you can be while it cooks, cools and then sits there in the fridge tantalising you).

I was not looking forward to trying this diet but because I was driven to make it work and prepare my lunch in the morning and create amazing cooked meals after work, I really enjoyed my food again.

I hope to stay on the diet until I feel my IBS is under control, it certainly is better but I don’t want to rush things and I want to let it heal, do some good. Then, as advised by the book and throughout the internet I shall try to reintroduce a FODMAP at a time and monitor my symptoms – I believe this will be the tricky part with a lot of trial and error – but if it means I won’t have to be so careful with what I eat and can enjoy a meal out, it will make it all worth it.


For further reading, I have also found support groups on Facebook to be helpful.

I have shared a few pictures of my low-FODMAP meals on Twitter I hope to post on here too describing each of the different meals.

My Facebook page contains latest news and tips on managing IBS and other digestive disorders.

Let’s educate ourselves on digestive health and support others to find a friend in food.

Serotonin and Symptoms

Serotonin and Symptoms

This post is similar to my post Emotions and Symptoms because your emotions are affected by your serotonin levels. Although this post will be more scientific and relate to what foods are best to eat to increase serotonin levels.

Serotonin is a neurotransmitter, meaning it is a chemical messenger, sending and receiving signals / messages from around the body. It is located in the brain but also is produced from specialised cells in the gastrointestinal tract (it does not travel between the two). Serotonin’s main purpose is to regulate signal intensity and in turn this regulates our basic function and mood.

In short, when serotonin levels are low, we are depressed and when they are high, we are happy.

Your gut produces around 80-95 percent of serotonin in your body and changes in your serotonin levels can affect your gut as well as your brain.

Roles it can have on gut function include:

  • Contractions in our intestines
  • Mobility of bowels – how fast food moves through your system
  • How much fluid, such as mucus, is secreted in your intestines
  • How sensitive your intestines are to sensations such as pain and fullness from eating
  • Acts on the guts nerves to signal pain, nausea and other gut problems
  • Influences how full we feel, therefore how hungry we are feeling

Exercise and relaxation techniques like meditation can alter your serotonin levels enough to have a positive impact on your symptoms. Scientists have found that even sunshine can alter your serotonin levels – no wonder people like to holiday somewhere sunny in the winter months!

There are also foods that can improve with your serotonin levels.

Serotonin-rich foods include:

  • Walnuts
  • Bananas
  • Kiwi
  • Pineapple
  • Plums
  • Tomatoes

However, your body needs an amino acid named, tryptophan in order to produce serotonin. The foods below contain this amino acid:

  • Bananas
  • Turkey
  • Milk
  • Yoghurt
  • Eggs
  • Nuts
  • Beans
  • Fish
  • Some cheeses, including Cheddar

Your vitamin intake can also affect serotonin, the most important are thiamine (vitamin B1) and folic acid (vitamin B9), two components of Vitamin B Complex.

Deficiency symptoms, relating to digestion in the vitamins above include nausea, stomach pains and a poor appetite.

Food sources containing, Thiamine, Vitamin B1:

  • Brown Rice
  • Pork
  • Peas
  • Peanuts
  • Pulses

Food sources containing, Folic Acid, Vitamin B9:

  • Liver
  • Green, leafy Vegetables (spinach, broccoli)
  • Peanuts
  • Bananas (forget about an apple a day, have a banana!)

There are more foods I could add to each list but I have tried to keep the list for foods best for your stomach and as always if you have a food intolerance, allergy or any unwanted symptoms with any of the foods above it is best to avoid them – choose something else on the list to try, otherwise supplements are readily available, just make sure you keep to the correct dosages.


I hope this has given an insight into how food can impact our mood.

Join in the conversation by commenting below and following on Facebook and Twitter. Let’s educate ourselves on digestive health and support others to Find a Friend in Food.

Lost Your Appetite?

We all experience at loss of appetite at some point, especially after being ill and having a stomach upset.

So how do we encourage our stomach and minds to want food again?

One thing not to do is miss any meals thinking it will increase your appetite for at least one meal in the day. The trick is to eat around six small meals a day to stimulate the appetite twice as much as three substantial meal or none at all.

These meals should be of small quantities and light on the stomach, for example mashed bananas, yoghurt or scrambled eggs. To ensure you are getting the nutrients you need have high-calorie, high-energy foods or have as a smoothie for easier consumption.

Along with these type of foods you may want to take a multivitamin supplement to wake up a dull appetite. A lack of appetite is also a symptom linked to Zinc deficiency, as it is essential for your body’s normal function and development. Zinc can be found in steak, pumpkin seeds, brazil nuts and egg yolk. Most Zinc is lost when food is processed so you may want to take a supplement as you may not feel like eating an oyster or an 8oz steak which both give you the 15g of Zinc as part of the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA).

Fresh air and gentle exercise will help improve normal day to day functions, a stroll around your local park will do wonders to perk up your appetite.

Make sure you are drinking plenty of water, take sips throughout the day, if you drink one or more glasses in one go this will make you feel fuller, especially just before a meal.

Cook food that smells and looks good to awaken your senses and hopefully your appetite.

Make the most of your meal times by being in a relaxed environment, without any distractions and I advise not eating in the room you have been spending your days ill in as this might make your loss of appetite worse.

I know when I’m at home alone and have a lot to do, I often lose track of time and forget to eat altogether. The best way to avoid this from happening is to keep a clock nearby or set alarms on your phone to remind you to eat. Sometimes we have so much to think about eating isn’t our top priority but in order to have enough energy we need to eat.

So make sure you are fuelling yourself up to succeed, even if it is just for finishing the housework.